Taking vs Making


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It may seem like a small thing, but I have noticed that most of the professional photographers I look up to refer to making a picture/image/photograph.  By contrast, most others refer to taking a picture.  So what’s the difference?

Taking a picture is a straight forward process.  To many people that process is get out your phone/camera, see something you want a picture of, push the button and then upload/share it.  Facebook, Instagram, etc. are loaded with such pictures.  Don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing wrong with such pictures, they help to convey an immediate image.

Making a picture is a very different process.  Yes it starts out with getting out a camera (it can even be the one in your phone!).  From there, the process moves in a very different direction.  When making an image, the photographer spends the time needed to understand the subject not just, okay that’s a nice (pick something) that could be a great subject.  Now come the questions… How to capture that subject in a way that shows it best; what is the light and how does it impact the subject; what about the surroundings, keep them in focus or not…and the list goes on.  When making an image we often scout out the location in advance to find the best spot.  When going to capture the image, we will get there well before the time comes for actually hitting the shutter so that when the light is just right we are ready.

I am a firm believer in capturing multiple shots.  With today’s digital technology there is no cost to it.  Besides, it often happens that the second, third or whatever shot turns out to be the best.  In other scenarios, we capture two, three or more shots with slight variations in settings so that we capture the full spectrum of that image.

That brings us to the other part of the making process, post processing.  With digital photography, the computer has replaced the darkroom.  In the film days, there were drop off sites where you could leave your film for processing and come back in a day or two to get your prints.  There were also custom labs where you could get the work done.  It cost more and took longer, but the difference was obvious.  Under most circumstances, you can take a picture from your camera and be done… taking a picture.  When making a picture, it gets tweaked, polished and finished with any number of digital tools like Lightroom and Photoshop.  In the case where we took a series of shots with different settings, the software will combine them so that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.  To be clear, I’m not talking about creating an image in Photoshop, rather using Photoshop to make the image something special.

One of my mentors keeps telling us to let the camera do as much work as possible.  What he means is that the better the quality of the image coming out of the camera, the easier it will be to post process it and the greater the likelihood that the end result will be something you can be proud of.  I always try to follow this advise…with varying levels of success!

To give you a concrete example…I take a lot of shots at Duke Farms here in Hillsborough.  It is a wonderful education center that is open to the public for free.  On the property is an old barn known as the Hay Barn.  Go to the site for details.  Lots of people take pictures of the Hay Barn.  I have my fair share of them too.  When most people show me their shots I ask one question, where are the faces?  They usually give me a puzzled look or ask if I’ve taken my medicine.  Then I explain that when taken from the correct angle in the right light, you can see faces in the the wall (see the accompanying picture).  When I show them they understand what I’m talking about.  When I explain how it’s done, in most cases, the eyes start to glaze.  The difference between taking and making.

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John Feist Photography

I am a photographer in central New Jersey. My photography covers a number of categories, mostly nature, street, travel and black & white. I initially set up this blog to document my efforts at becoming a professional photographer. Since then I've expanded it to discuss topics that I think are relevant to good photography and occasionally document my travels and photographic adventures. Please feel free to comment, constructively, on any of my posts. I'm always open to honest criticism of my post or photography.

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